Skip Nav

10 Fresh Writing Prompts for High School English

Assignment Writing Services – Customizable Options

❶Sign up for our free weekly newsletter and receive top education news, lesson ideas, teaching tips and more! To get information on a particular life stage, e.

Welcome to our

Questions & Answers
Categories
Getting the Paper Exactly the Way You Want It Done

Then Parts of a Business Letter will help you prepare your students for the business world. Give your students some pointers in writing business communications, and then have them write letters to organizations.

They could write to support the efforts of a charity or to complain about a problem with a product or a service. You might even have them write to an address in the book Free Stuff for Kids published by Meadowbrook Press and request free materials. Anyone who writes knows how daunting the empty page can be!

Graphic organizers help students overcome the blank sheet and help them put their thoughts in a logical order. Setting and Events are designed to be used in writing personal narratives, and Persuasive helps students create persuasive pieces by forcing them to state an opinion, support it with three points, give examples, and summarize their belief in a conclusion.

Writing Plans from The Teacher's Desk Put one of these great writing activities to good use in your classroom. Choices include a list of assignments for fifth- and sixth-grade students to write a paragraph a week for two years! The site explains how to write a research paper, tells how to locate information on the Internet, and advises students about what material is best found in the library, not on the Web.

More than 1, FREE lessons. PD content to get you through the day. Download without a subscription. Receive timely lesson ideas and PD tips.

Receive timely lesson ideas and PD tips Thank you for subscribing to the Educationworld. Classroom Problem Solver Dr. Trending Icebreakers Volume 5: It's time to make a fresh start.

You've done some summer reading on classroom management, and you're eager to try out some new ideas. You've learned from past mistakes, and you look forward this year to avoiding those mistakes.

Most fun of all, the opening days of school are an opportunity to get to know a whole new group of kids! What will you do during those first few days of school?

What activities might you do to help you get to know your new students? What activities will help students get to know you and one another? For the last three years, Education World has presented a new group of getting-to-know-you ideas -- or icebreakers -- for those first days of school.

Here are 19 ideas -- ideas tried and tested by Education World readers -- to help develop classroom camaraderie during the opening days of school. Opening-Day Letter Still looking for more ideas? Don't forget our archive of more than icebreaker activities. Write a letter to your students. In that letter, introduce yourself to students.

Tell them about your hopes for the new school year and some of the fun things you'll be doing in class. In addition, tell students a few personal things about yourself; for example, your likes and dislikes, what you did over the summer, and your hobbies.

Ask questions throughout the letter. You might ask what students like most about school, what they did during the summer, what their goals for the new school year are, or what they are really good at. In your letter, be sure to model the correct parts of a friendly letter! On the first day of school, display your letter on an overhead projector. Then pass each student a sheet of nice stationery. Have the students write return letters to you. In this letter, they will need to answer some of your questions and tell you about themselves.

This is a great way to get to know each other in a personal way! Mail the letter to students before school starts, and enclose a sheet of stationery for kids to write you back. Each piece should have a matching piece of the same length. There should be enough pieces so that each student will have one. Then give each student one piece of string, and challenge each student to find the other student who has a string of the same length.

After students find their matches, they can take turns introducing themselves to one another. You can provide a list of questions to help students "break the ice," or students can come up with their own. You might extend the activity by having each student introduce his or her partner to the class. Give each student a slip of paper with the name of an animal on it. Then give students instructions for the activity: They must locate the other members of their animal group by imitating that animal's sound only.

No talking is allowed. The students might hesitate initially, but that hesitation soon gives way to a cacophony of sound as the kids moo, snort, and giggle their way into groups. The end result is that students have found their way into their homerooms or advisory groups for the school year, and the initial barriers to good teamwork have already been broken.

Hold a large ball of yarn. Start by telling the students something about yourself. Then roll the ball of yarn to a student without letting go of the end of the yarn. The student who gets the ball of yarn tells his or her name and something good about himself or herself. Then the student rolls the yarn to somebody else, holding on to the strand of yarn. Soon students have created a giant web. After everyone has spoken, you and all the students stand up, continuing to hold the yarn.

Start a discussion of how this activity relates to the idea of teamwork -- for example, the students need to work together and not let others down. To drive home your point about teamwork, have one student drop his or her strand of yarn; that will demonstrate to students how the web weakens if the class isn't working together. Questions might include the following: What is your name? Where were you born? How many brothers or sisters do you have?

What are their names? Do you have any pets? Tell students to write those questions on a piece of paper and to add to that paper five more questions they could ask someone they don't know. Pair students, and have each student interview his or her partner and record the responses. Then have each student use the interview responses to write a "dictionary definition" of his or her partner to include in a Student Dictionary.

You might model this activity by creating a sample dictionary definition about yourself. Born in Riverside, California. No brothers or sisters. Have students bring in small pictures of themselves to paste next to their entries in the Student Dictionary. Bind the definitions into a book, and display it at back-to-school night. Ask each student to write a brief description of his or her physical characteristics on one index card and his or her name on the other. Physical characteristics usually do not include clothing, but if you teach the primary grades, you might allow students to include clothing in their descriptions.

Put all the physical characteristic index cards in a shoe box, mix them up, and distribute one card to each student, making sure that no student gets his or her own card. Give students ten minutes to search for the person who fits the description on the card they hold. There is no talking during this activity, but students can walk around the room.

At the end of the activity, tell students to write on the card the name of the student who best matches the description. Then have students share their results. How many students guessed correctly? Patricia McHugh, John W. Set up a circle of chairs with one less chair than the number of students in the class.

Play music as the students circle around the chairs. When the music stops, the students must sit in a seat. Unlike the traditional game, the person without a seat is not out. Instead, someone must make room for that person. Then remove another seat and start the music again. The kids end up on one another's laps and sharing chairs! You can play this game outside, and you can end it whenever you wish. Afterward, stress the teamwork and cooperation the game took, and how students needed to accept one another to be successful.

Reinforce that idea by repeating this game throughout the year. Danielle Weston, Willard School, Sanford, Maine Hands-On Activity Have students begin this activity by listing at least 25 words that describe them and the things they like.

Sed egestas, sapien a pellentesque euismod, odio nibh dignissim nulla, euismod lacinia arcu turpis gravida tortor. All World Audition Conducted in Agency. Nam pellentesque magna at augue blandit, in eleifend nulla vehicula.

Proin maximus porta varius. Nam vitae neque ut quam egestas pharetra a sed erat. Donec tempor enim ut sollicitudin pulvinar. Nulla sit amet blandit lectus. Donec porta semper lacus, in facilisis est finibus a. Nam vitae luctus quam, nec accumsan sapien. Porta semper lacus, in facilisis est finibus a. Nam vitae luctus quam, nec accumsan sapien donec.

Lacus, in facilisis est finibus a. What issue or cause should receive its own "awareness" month? Awareness Month Nomination Writing Prompt: Do you trust our institutions to keep us safe? How did this person make a positive impact in your life? Teacher Appreciation Writing Prompt: Write a letter to yourself with the intention that you'll be reading this again at the end of the school year.

Think about your goals, where your head is now, and where you hope to be in 10 months. Fight or Flight by sophtar Writing Prompt Summary: Letter to Me Writing Prompt: Have you ever been bullied, teased or picked on? If so, about what? I was bullied because of my acne by annchovy Writing Prompt Summary: What stresses you out, and how do you cope with that stress? What Stresses Me Out: Teen Stress Lesson Plan: What are you most thankful for?

What is your relationship with money? How do you spend or save and why? Who is your hero? Teen Heroes Lesson Plan: What suggestion s do you have to make a positive change at your school or with the educational system as a whole? What form of media impacts your life the most, and why? Is prom a negative or positive high school tradition? Catching a Fairytale Writing Prompt Summary: What is one thing you don't know about your Mother or Father?

Teens and Parental Relationships Writing Prompt: What was the most difficult thing you overcame this or last school year? I Overcame my first break-up by schoi94 Writing Prompt Summary: What organization, company, non-profit or 'cause' will help make the world a better place? What is the value of marriage? Let me keep my childhood dream by purpleoveralls Writing Prompt Summary: What is the most difficult thing for you about planning for or attending college?

What is one behavior you can either change or incorporate into your daily life that will reduce our negative impact on the environment? Nearly a million people visit Stage of Life each year for two main reasons:

Receive timely lesson ideas and PD tips

Main Topics

Privacy Policy

The student can specify a page number, content, formatting design, the arguments, and evidence, the due date, and the high school student gets a bit of stress relief knowing the assignment is .

Privacy FAQs

Writing Prompts for High School and College Students Looking for interesting writing prompt ideas for your Creative Writing or Language Arts class? Below are just a few of the previous teen essay writing prompts used in edupdf.ga's monthly, national student writing contest.

About Our Ads

Writing assignment for high school students. Check out this essay on the social effects of wwii. (well, so far, i'm taking the kids to the science museum.) 5 paragraph essay on church. 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing. Summary: Few sources available today offer writing teachers such succinct, practice-based help—which is one reason why 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing was the winner of the Association of Education Publishers Distinguished Achievement Award for .

Cookie Info

Students in some Albany High School English classes were asked this week as part of a persuasive writing assignment to make an abhorrent argument: "You must argue that Jews are evil, and use solid. Writing Prompts for High School NEW High School Cause and Effect Prompt 1. At a recent conference at the University of Chicago, David Walsh of the National Institute on Media and the Family presented a paper titled “ Video Game Violence and Public Policy.”.